“The Hot Spotters”

In an insightful New Yorker piece, Atul Gawande discusses saving on healthcare costs by addressing, and closely monitoring, the neediest patients.

Brenner wasn’t all that interested in costs; he was more interested in helping people who received bad health care. But in his experience the people with the highest medical costs—the people cycling in and out of the hospital—were usually the people receiving the worst care. “Emergency-room visits and hospital admissions should be considered failures of the health-care system until proven otherwise,” he told me—failures of prevention and of timely, effective care.

If he could find the people whose use of medical care was highest, he figured, he could do something to help them. If he helped them, he would also be lowering their health-care costs. And, if the stats approach to crime was right, targeting those with the highest health-care costs would help lower the entire city’s health-care costs. His calculations revealed that just one per cent of the hundred thousand people who made use of Camden’s medical facilities accounted for thirty per cent of its costs. That’s only a thousand people—about half the size of a typical family physician’s panel of patients.

Post to Twitter Post to Digg Post to Facebook Post to Google Buzz Send Gmail Post to Reddit Post to StumbleUpon

Comments Off

Filed under Physician authors, Policy

Comments are closed.