Monthly Archives: November 2011

Heard on the Floors #4 – Uganda

In commemoration of the upcoming World AIDS Day on Thursday, December 1, we’ll be thinking about HIV/AIDS this week. Below, a reflection from Uganda written by Nelson Chiu, a fourth year at NJMS. Ward 4A is the Infectious Diseases in-patient … Continue reading

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Filed under Chronic illness, Heard on the Floors

The Art of Alzheimer’s

Physicians are not trained to interpret paintings, and most patients do not have a lifetime of artwork to analyze. However, a rare opportunity for both to occur is at the Museum of Modern Art’s exhibition “de Kooning: A Retrospective.” Willem … Continue reading

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Filed under Arts, Chronic illness

Heard on the floors #3

Mr. M was a 60 year old Asian male who was diagnosed three months ago with cholangiocarcinoma- cancer of the gallbladder bile ducts. He was brought into surgery one week ago, because the CT scan suggested that it may be … Continue reading

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Filed under Day in the Life, Ethics, Heard on the Floors, Hidden curriculum, Storytelling

Radium Girls of Jersey

Every so often, an example from class resonates beyond statistics on a slide. Today second-years covered the occupational causes of cancer, among them coal tar and asbestos.  One particularly notorious (and tragic) case occurred just around the corner in Orange, … Continue reading

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Filed under Education, History of Medicine

Just clowning around

The first International Conference on Medicine and Medical Clowning was held last week in Jerusalem. Medical clowning, which combines theater performance with drama therapy and elements of nursing, has grown in popularity in recent years to become a worldwide phenomenon, … Continue reading

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Filed under Arts, Research

New Robot Improves Eye Surgery, Does Not Replace Surgeon

“Good morning! I will be your surgeon today, and operating a robot in the adjacent room. Do you have any questions?” A patient may be alarmed by the notion of a robot involved in their operation, but robotic surgery is … Continue reading

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Filed under Physician-patient relationship, Technology

A silent epidemic

The NY Times reports on the disturbing statistics of New York’s state homes. Hopefully the article will bring some deserved attention to the matter. In New York, it is unusually common for developmentally disabled people in state care to die … Continue reading

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Filed under Uncategorized

Growing pains of a medical student

Shara Yurkiewicz, a second year medical student who blogs at This may hurt a bit, describes what happens when doctor-patient boundaries are unintentionally blurred. At the very end of the exam, I tested his cerebellar function.  Touch your nose and … Continue reading

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Filed under Education, Physician-patient relationship, Storytelling

You heard it here first!

We’re thrilled to announce the first annual student-run Humanism Conference, hosted by the Healthcare Foundation Center for Humanism and Medicine at UMDNJ-New Jersey Medical School. Mark your calendars for Wednesday, March 14, 2012 in Newark, NJ for a day featuring … Continue reading

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Filed under Education, Humanism, Research

Day in the life of an MSIII – Surgery Rotation

4:00 AM – Alarm goes off.  It’s going to be dark for another 2 hours. Sweet. 4:25 AM – Leave the house. Relatively sure I forgot something, but my brain still isn’t functioning, so I ignore the warning bells. 4:40 … Continue reading

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Filed under Day in the Life, Heard on the Floors, Hidden curriculum, Storytelling