Monthly Archives: October 2011

What might have been

Mona Simpson, sister of Steve Jobs and visionary in her own right, describes Jobs’ mind’s perpetual motion even at the end. Be sure to read the beautiful eulogy in its entirety. Intubated, when he couldn’t talk, he asked for a … Continue reading

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Filed under Cancer

I knew it would all pay off in the end

For all the times I’ve been criticized for playing Mariokart way, way past my bedtime– it was all surgery training. I promise. The researchers found that surgeons or residents who used to be avid video game players had significantly better … Continue reading

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Filed under Education, Mental health

Welcome to medical school

This week, first-year students at New Jersey Med begin a time-honored rite of passage – anatomy lab. Below, a video from Dream Anatomy, an exhibition by the National Library of  Medicine. via Morbid Anatomy

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Filed under Arts, Education, History of Medicine

Heard on the floors #2 OB-GYN edition

OB-GYN is typically divided into 3 parts- the obstetrics floors, where babies are delivered, the gynecology service, which deals with various gynecological surgeries, and the outpatient clinic, which does everything from pap smears to postpartum care. When people hear OB-GYN, … Continue reading

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Filed under Day in the Life, Heard on the Floors, Hidden curriculum, Humanism, Storytelling

The Good Doctor – JAMA

Shekinah Elmore, medical student and rhabdosarcoma survivor, has a fantastic piece in JAMA about humanism in medicine. How can we educate medical students to preserve the caring instinct? From the first day of orientation, we’re taught that medicine is holistic … Continue reading

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Filed under Cancer, Education, Hidden curriculum, Humanism

Living with a death sentence

Emily Rapp, a professor of creative writing at Santa Fe University, writes about how a parent deals with the knowledge that their child is dying of an incurable disease. She speaks of the need to parent in the moment, as … Continue reading

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Filed under Chronic illness, Love, Uncategorized

Heard on the floors #1

During my surgery rotation, I spent one day on call with the trauma surgery team. This day happened to be on a weekend, so I rounded with the team in the morning, then hung around in the trauma bay for … Continue reading

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Filed under Day in the Life, Education, Ethics, Heard on the Floors, Hidden curriculum, Humanism

Rhyme & Reason

Sometimes the timing is just right for rediscovering a childhood favorite. This week’s New Yorker has an interview with Norton Juster, author of The Phantom Tollboth, in honor of its 50th anniversary. To all the students out there, a few words … Continue reading

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Filed under Education, Literature

Humanism in Perspective: Trust

We’re excited to announce that the Director for the Center for Humanism at New Jersey Medical School, Dorian Wilson, MD, will be starting a new column here at The Human Fabric. Introducing the first installment of Humanism in Perspective: Humanism … Continue reading

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Filed under Humanism, Humanism in Perspective, Physician authors

Rebuilding the brain

Jane Rosett, former activist and current artist, discusses her slow recovery from traumatic brain injury. I am often amazed to find that people recognize me when I have no recollection of them. People who love me grieve what they claim … Continue reading

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Filed under Chronic illness, Neuroscience