Monthly Archives: April 2011

Shadows Bright as Glass

Once again this week we’re addressing the mind-body problem, this time through art. Writer Amy Nutt’s new book, Shadows Bright as Glass displays the artwork of Jon Sarkin, a chiropractor who suffered a severe stroke and found an new identity … Continue reading

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Filed under Literature, Neuroscience

Graceful surrender

The title of this article really says it best, “The Sad, Beautiful  Fact That We’re Going to Miss Almost Everything.” For humans, there is a near infinite amount of art and literature to be exposed to, spanning thousands of years … Continue reading

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Filed under Education, Literature

The Emperor of All Maladies

Siddhartha Mukherjee, oncologist and author of The Emperor of All Maladies, recently received the Pulitzer Prize for his biography of cancer. The book is both scientifically enlightening and humanistic in its approach to suffering patients, not to mention Mukherjee’s beautifully … Continue reading

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Filed under Cancer, Humanism, Literature, Physician authors

Mind, consciousness and possibility

David Eagleman is a neuroscientist at Baylor College of Medicine who studies perception of time, circadian rhythms, time-traveling minds, and the essence of consciousness. Here’s the engrossing New Yorker report on his research. Eagleman had to wait a few weeks to be granted … Continue reading

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Filed under Neuroscience

All you need is love

Sadie Bond is just one year old, and both of her parents have cancer. Nathan and Elisa Bond, both 30-something parents in Brooklyn, were diagnosed this year within two weeks of each other. They’ve started a blog to chronicle their … Continue reading

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Filed under Cancer, Love

Life and Limb

Of the three million soldiers who fought during the civil war, nearly half a million were injured but survived. The U.S  National Libary of Medicine has assembled a beautiful new exhibit dedicated to these men, their experiences, and the medicine … Continue reading

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Filed under History of Medicine

Update: Case closed

For many who read the solution to the Times’ mystery diagnosis a few weeks ago, something remained amiss. Today, Lisa Sanders insightfully addresses how a patient with such serious symptoms could remain unaware of her condition. Sarah of Washington wrote: “I’m really … Continue reading

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Filed under Chronic illness

Cutting for Stone

NPR’s book club read Abraham Verghese’s Cutting for Stone this month and chatted with the author. On the choice between life and work: Medicine presents us with this false dichotomy, or rather this temptation, that you come to medicine incomplete, … Continue reading

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Filed under Literature, Physician authors

The terrible evil

Illness takes a deep physical and emotional toll not just on the patient, but on the family as well. In today’s Letter of Note, Edgar Allan Poe describes his wife’s physical suffering, and his subsequent psychological descent. You say —”Can … Continue reading

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Filed under Literature, Love, Suffering

Work and life

Peter Bach, an oncologist at Sloan-Kettering whose wife is undergoing radiation for breast cancer, describes what it’s like to be back at work. It was my first time seeing patients since my wife’s diagnosis. I had developed a deep anxiety … Continue reading

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Filed under Cancer