Category Archives: History of Medicine

That’s our namesake!

In an awesome bit of history of medicine news, Andreas Vesalius’ personal 1555 copy of De corporis humani fabrica (On the Workings of the Human Body) has been found. The margins feature his handwritten notes for a new edition. If … Continue reading

Comments Off

Filed under History of Medicine

Radium Girls of Jersey

Every so often, an example from class resonates beyond statistics on a slide. Today second-years covered the occupational causes of cancer, among them coal tar and asbestos.  One particularly notorious (and tragic) case occurred just around the corner in Orange, … Continue reading

Comments Off

Filed under Education, History of Medicine

Welcome to medical school

This week, first-year students at New Jersey Med begin a time-honored rite of passage – anatomy lab. Below, a video from Dream Anatomy, an exhibition by the National Library of  Medicine. via Morbid Anatomy

Comments Off

Filed under Arts, Education, History of Medicine

It’s alive!

What does it mean to create a monster, or to cross the line between nature and experimentation? A new exhibit at the US National Library of Medicine takes a look at Frankenstein, through the lens of bioethics. In 1818, Shelley’s story … Continue reading

Comments Off

Filed under Ethics, History of Medicine

Rounding in the Gallery

Historical figures aren’t the only ones subjected to mystery diagnosis in the modern age. At the National Gallery in London, Professor Michael Baum organizes gallery rounds where he and his students analyze works of art through a clinician’s lens. (via BiblioOdyssey) … Continue reading

Comments Off

Filed under Arts, Education, History of Medicine, Storytelling

“Death of a pathology centre”

What do you do with 90 million tissues samples when their home is closing? That’s the challenge faced by the Armed Forces Institute of Pathology, AFIP. What grew from an army medical museum into a consulting agency and one of the … Continue reading

Comments Off

Filed under History of Medicine, Policy, War

The underlying factor is people

Like when Captain Sully landed smoothly on the Hudson, sometimes people just get it right in emergencies. Here, a memorandum from a Dallas hospital in November, 1963: At 1:07 p.m., Sunday, November 24, 1963, Lee. H. Oswald, accused assassin of … Continue reading

Comments Off

Filed under History of Medicine

Which is it this time Holmes, cocaine or morphine?

So asks Watson of the great literary detective. But Sherlock Holmes certainly wasn’t the only thinker of his era to plunge himself into experimentation with drugs. Both Sigmund Freud, father of psychoanalysis, and William Halsted, giant of American surgery, suffered … Continue reading

Comments Off

Filed under History of Medicine, Suffering

If you squint

…your painting might be more convincing. Stereo blindness, or lack of depth perception, may actually be an advantage when it comes to art. Looking at the world through one eye at a time automatically “flattens the scene,” said Margaret S. Livingstone, … Continue reading

Comments Off

Filed under Arts, History of Medicine

Once upon a time…

Frank Netter and Eric Carle joined forces. Well not really, but if they had, they just might have created the anatomy pop-up books on display in Animated Anatomies, a new exhibit at Duke University’s Perkins Library. Anatomical flap books  featuring … Continue reading

Comments Off

Filed under Arts, Education, History of Medicine